In the late 1940’s, David Rosen was a student at the Boston University School of Social Work. He did his first student placement at the JF&CS youth office in the west end of Boston, doing field work with teens. He had just completed three and a half years in the army, including serving in the 82nd Airborne, liberating a German labor camp at the end of WWII. He recalls his first case at JF&CS when he was assigned to a teenage boy. He asked his supervisor what to do. “She said that the kid liked horror movies. So off we went to see some horror movies.”

More than six decades later, David Rosen has returned to JF&CS, this time as a participant at the JF&CS Memory Café in Waltham. Instead of going to movies, David gets to meet with renown artists who bring cultural programming to JF&CS while he and others experiencing memory changes enjoy coffee and conversation with new friends, including students from Brandeis University. “One [meeting was led by] a dancer, and I used to enjoy going to the ballet. I enjoyed it very much,” says David.

The youngest of four brothers, David was born and raised in Boston’s west end, near today’s Massachusetts General Hospital. He graduated from Boston Latin High School and followed his brother to college at Ohio State, from which he graduated in 1942. He credits WWII with temporarily saving him from figuring out what he wanted to do with his life after graduation.

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