Matt Pultman, left, and Ari Kendall

Rami’s in Coolidge Corner is a Boston kosher food institution. Now Matt Pultman and Ari Kendall are taking the show on the road. I asked them about the process of getting a kosher food truck up and running.

It seemed like the old progression was to start with a food truck and then hopefully grow into a brick-and-mortar restaurant. Why did you guys decide to do a food truck now?

As we have seen the food truck movement come to Boston and explode, we both wanted to get ahead of the curve and establish ourselves within the food truck community while it was still young. We decided to adopt Rami’s business model and menu, as it has a significant name in Boston and a tried-and-true business model.

Is the process for having a kosher food truck any different from having a kosher restaurant?

A kosher food truck follows all the same guidelines as a kosher restaurant in the same way that any health codes that apply to restaurants apply to trucks as well.

I understand this is a second start for you. Can you tell us what happened when you first started the food truck? 

On the second day we were open, back in October, we experienced a propane leak that seeped into the wall and ignited, causing a fire that put the truck out of commission. After several months of rebuilding and tweaking our operation, we are back and ready to take on Boston’s hungry masses.

The guy behind the counter at Rami’s always refuses to put French fries in my falafel. Will you put French fries in my pita? 

Of course! We pride ourselves on customer service and pumping out sandwich after sandwich according to your personal specifications.

Four questions is a weekly interview column featuring interesting people connected with the Greater Boston Jewish community. Find past columns here. Have an idea of someone we should interview? Email Molly!