created at: 2014-05-15

We all know that if you need a cab these days, you can easily Uber it, or if you need a place to stay, you can use Couchsurfing. The creepy factor in this new wave of person-to-person services may be highly debated, but as Wired Magazine’s cover story this month says, there is much good to come of trusting and connecting with one another.

For example, Groupmuse is a project in Boston that is capitalizing on this model to bring classical music to the masses. In a nutshell, Groupmuse is “Couchsurfing meets a farmers market,” as co-founder Ezra Ingerson Weller told me.

Written up in The Boston Globe, WBUR’s The ARTery, The Improper Bostonian and more, this year-old concept has made quite an impression on a city that prides itself on music. With the vast array of incredible music institutions in this city, it’s somewhat surprising that many of us in our 20s and 30s have never had an experience with classical music that hooks us. Groupmuse is hoping to do just that by connecting chamber musicians with hosts, and hosts with quality entertainment. And I’m not talking stuffy old-school salons—think of a packed Northeastern party on Columbus, wall-to-wall with young people enjoying a classical quartet.

To Ezra, that’s one of the coolest parts of what Groupmuse accomplishes. As he says, “There is vindication that there is something different when this music is played in these different venues.” This change of perception is just what classical music needs to stay current, and what better city than Boston for this to happen?

Having some friends over Saturday night? Visit Groupmuse to add a little music to your party. Or if you’re a musician, log in to connect with hosts and share the love. It’s low key, low cost—donations go to the artists only—and a great way to feel cultured while doing what you would normally be doing!

*Photo courtesy of Groupmuse