August 29, 2015 / 14th of Elul, 5775
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261 Blog Posts

  • Cheesefort.jpg
    Between Hanukkah and Christmas, December is filled with a surplus of food and drink. And if you celebrated either of these holidays, there’s a good chance you’ve got leftover cheese and wine in your refrigerator. Fromage fort, a French cheese spread, puts both of those to good... Read More
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  • Salt2.jpg
    As a lifelong procrastinator, I’m often frantically looking for last-minute gifts for party hosts and coworkers mere days before the end of the holidays. The perfect last-minute gift is something thoughtful, but also something whose pretty appearance belies how quick it was to... Read More
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  • Picmonkey_collage_gift_guide.jpg
    Giving a gift always feels good, but giving the perfect gift feels even better. Check out this roundup of fun, festive gifts for all the food-lovers on your list. GIFTS FOR THE HUNGRY READER “Secret Restaurant Recipes From the World’​s Top Kosher Restaurants” by... Read More
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  • Cauliflower_latkes.jpg
    We all know it’s not nice to lie to your children. But withholding information is a different thing entirely. So if your kids are picky eaters, wait until they wolf down these latkes before you tell them they were made with, wait for it…cauliflower. Yep, cauliflower! I swear... Read More
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  • Sweetpotlatkesraita.jpg
    I’m a huge fan of the customary latke accoutrements of applesauce and sour cream, but why limit yourself? For something a little less traditional, I paired sweet potato and shallot latkes with a cucumber raita. Raita is an Indian condiment that’s a mix of yogurt, spices and... Read More
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  • Beetlatkes.jpg
    This recipe borrows the beet-and-dill pairing (and vibrant fuchsia color!) of borscht, the refreshing Russian soup. Since beets don’t release as much liquid as potatoes, you don’t have to squeeze them after grating, which expedites the preparation process. Just be careful... Read More
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  • Celeryrootappleandhoney.jpg
    Potatoes may be the most traditional type of latke, but other root vegetables, such as celery root, work well too. Celery root is that kind of ugly bulb you see in the grocery store. It’s not much to look at, but once it’s peeled, the flesh is firm and mellow. Its mild celery... Read More
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  • Cinnamonsugarlatkes.jpg
    Apples and latkes on Hanukkah are as classic as apples and honey on Rosh Hashanah. They’re usually served together but separate, by dolloping applesauce on top of a freshly fried latke. But why not incorporate apples into the latke? Here, tart Granny Smiths are mixed with the... Read More
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  • Gurlatkes2.jpg
    A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of attending a cooking demo with Janna Gur, who was in Boston promoting her new cookbook, “Jewish Soul Food.” At the intimate demo, sponsored by the New Center for Arts & Culture, Gur prepared these thick latkes, which are packed... Read More
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  • Zucchini_latkes.jpeg
    The same rules apply when turning a potato or a zucchini into a latke. Each of these vegetables has a lot of excess moisture, so be sure to get rid of as much of it as you can when preparing the batter. And be sure to use your judgment when preparing to put the batter in the pan; if... Read More
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