October 31, 2014 / 7th of Chesvan, 5775
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Mari Levine

  • Who says stuffing has to include bread? This gluten-free recipe combines quinoa with traditional mix-ins such as onions, celery, cranberries and walnuts. But the key to achieving the crispy crust akin to bread stuffing is fried leeks. Their crunch and sweetness will appeal to every one of your Thanksgiving guests.

    Recipe Notes: If you’re roasting a turkey this Thanksgiving, drizzling some of the resulting roasting liquid over the finished quinoa is a...

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  • If you’re hosting a Halloween party this weekend, forget the spiced pumpkin Yankee Candle; the aroma of roasted pumpkin seeds fills a kitchen with the scents of fall.

    And those scents can vary depending on your tastes. Chances are you’ve roasted pumpkin seeds before. Simply sprinkling them with a little salt and baking them at a moderate heat is a great place to start, but why stop there? Pumpkin seeds are blank slates that take on other flavor...

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  • The meat sweats are real. I know this after spending my summer on an unplanned quest to eat as much beef jerky as I could get my carnivorous hands on. It started with a hiking trip with my friend Eric, who ordered the protein-packed, lightweight snack in bulk from Amazon before our departure. It continued with a trip to Smorgasburg in Brooklyn, where I acquired some Kings County Jerky. (The best $10.99 I spent all summer!) The quest continued with me eating j...

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  • Earlier this year, one of the hotly debated topics in the food world had to do with a certain one-ingredient dish. Some people enthusiastically believed it was high time this item got the recognition it deserved, while others expressed outrage over its exorbitant price tag on menus in trendy coffee shops and cafés. The latter didn’t understand why you would pay so much for something you could prepare in minutes in your own kitchen. One article ca...

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  • A couple of weeks ago, I had the pleasure—nay, the honor—of judging one of the events that earns Somerville its quirky, eccentric reputation: the cooking contest at the city’s Fluff Festival. During this annual celebration presented by Union Square Main Streets, thousands of people gather in the streets of Union Square to eat, appreciate and talk about Fluff, the smooth and sticky marshmallow spread that was invented in Somerville in 1914 (a...

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  • There are lots of ways to incorporate pomegranate into a Rosh Hashanah meal, and not all of them take the time or forethought of turning it into, say, ice cream, which I did last year. This time around, I’ve created a versatile recipe that uses the sweet-tart flavor of this “new fruit” and only takes a few minutes to prepare. The mustard and oil dulls the fruit juice’s deep red color, but its flavor is as bright as ever.

    Pomegranate Vin...

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  • Mia Scharpie and Gabe Fine are passionate about community. In their day jobs, Mia’s position as a landscape designer involves researching colleagues who work for social impact, and Gabe works on community-based health care in addition to managing a Boston food truck. Their love for the community carries over to their new project: Black Trumpet, Boston’s latest pop-up dinner club.

    In May, Black Trumpet launched its first meal: a six-course kosher menu f...

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  • The High Holidays fall right on the cusp of fall, which means the summer staples are being replaced with cooler-weather vegetables, such as butternut squash. Squash and fennel are two of my favorite vegetables because they get so sweet when you roast them at a high heat.

    Puff pastry streamlines this tart so you don’t have to make dough, and it’s elegant enough to serve at a holiday celebration. It looks like you’ve been working all day but ac...

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  • While my Ashkenazi family dips slices of apple into bowls of honey on Rosh Hashanah, Sephardic families feature these two ingredients in mansanada. This rustic compote couldn’t be simpler or more versatile. You simply simmer apple pieces in water, honey and spices, then remove the apples and reduce the sauce until slightly thickened—kind of like a thicker, less processed applesauce. I enjoyed it in yogurt, but the possibilities are endless: serve it h...

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  • Honey cake is the Jewish equivalent of fruit cake; it’s on holiday menus because of tradition, not because people actually enjoy it. The problem is that the whole is usually less than the sum of its parts—slick honey, warm spices and all the components of a sweet, moist cake somehow end up emerging from the oven dry and crumbly. So when you find a recipe that produces the ideal honey cake—sweet, moist and tall—you hold onto it. That’...

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Mari_levine_photo
Mari is a freelance food writer and an editor for America's Test Kitchen, where she combines her journalism and culinary degrees from Brandeis University and Johnson & Wales, respectively, with her restaurant and lifelong eating experience. When she's not working hoisin sauce into everything she eats or binging on anything sandwiched between two slices of bread, she can be found on her bike, engrossed in a documentary, or playing sports that involve throwing and/or catching a ball (the latest: flag football).

Latest Comments

How long with it last, and will it mold or become toxic
Chosen Eats: Homemade Beef Jerky
Looks good, but some credit to ABC Kitchen? http://food52.com/recipes/31228-abc-kitchen-s-butternut-squash-on-toast
Chosen Eats: Toast with Butternut Squash and Ricotta Cheese